Max Draitser | Southern California Bicycle Attorneys

Bike injuries can throw you off your game.
Call our office today. Let us advocate for you.

888-30BIKELAW (888-302-4535)

Max Draitser | Southern California Bicycle Attorneys

Bike injuries can throw you off your game.
Call our office today. Let us advocate for you.

888-30BIKELAW (888-302-4535)

Bicycle Injury Law And
Advocacy Is What We Do

How do e-bikes and regular bikes compare in terms of safety?

Cycling has long been popular in California, and the invention of e-bikes has made it even more so. Unlike traditional bicycles, e-bikes have motors inside them that make them go further than a traditional bike would while requiring less effort from the rider. Typically, new technologies make things safer, but this is not always the case, and research suggests that e-bikes may actually be less safe than traditional bicycles.

Per People Powered Movement, the number of people using e-bikes skyrocketed in recent years as health concerns kept many commuters from using public transportation. In fact, the number of people using e-bikes increased nine times over in early 2020.

How injury rates compare among regular and e-bike users

Researchers are still gathering data to determine just how traditional bicycles and e-bikes differ when it comes to safety. However, studies show that riders of traditional bikes face a 7.5% risk of suffering an internal injury in a bicycle crash. E-bike users, meanwhile, face a heightened, 17% chance of suffering an internal injury in a bike wreck. This may be due in part to the fact that e-bikes tend to travel at faster speeds than traditional, human-powered bicycles.

What risks e-bike riders face

A recent study shined a spotlight on some of the biggest risks e-bike riders face when traveling. E-bike riders are three times as likely as traditional bike users to suffer an injury in a wreck involving a pedestrian. They also face a higher risk of experiencing a concussion than traditional bicycle riders.

Studies also indicate that e-bikes tend to have more defects than standard bicycles, which further compounds injury risks for riders.

Photo of attorney Max Draitser
FindLaw Network